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With the experts saying the peak of this could be a few months away how are placed to ride this financially. 8 games left so either 4 or 5 five home games would have been included in that. Maybe the money saved from not signing anyone may help. 

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Clubs will have insurances to cover loss of income, I'd expect. Most recent accounts state we have >£1m in the bank too. 

We'll be fine. 

Edit:

Looks like it's not quite as clear cut as I've suggested, BBC article from a few days ago:

 

Sport around the world is taking measures to prevent the spread of coronavirus, with events taking place without spectators and even being postponed.

But what is the financial cost to teams when games are played behind closed doors, and does that even matter given the wider health concerns?

In football, Italy's Serie A or England's Premier League might be able ride out any shortfall because TV income rather than ticket sales make up the bulk of their revenue.

Teams further down the football ladder rely on gate receipts to a far greater degree - and for a club that already has financial problems, it could lead to dire consequences.

Portsmouth chief executive officer Mark Catlin says the impact on clubs in League One and League Two could be "devastating".

EFL representatives also made clear to the government at a meeting on Monday that insurance policies would come nowhere near covering such losses.

Mark Palios, chairman of League One Tranmere Rovers, says many clubs "operate hand to mouth" and playing games without crowds for the rest of the season could cost his team up to £500,000 in lost income.

But Accrington Stanley owner Andy Holt, whose club are 17th in the same division, says: "I am really concerned [by the financial impact] but not as concerned as I would be about getting a grip on this coronavirus crisis. I think we need to get on top of it.

"It is OK talking about financial ramifications. If I lose half of my fans to this disease, I have long-term financial ramifications that may be far more critical."

What is the financial cost?

League One Bury were expelled from the Football League in August and Bolton Wanderers suffered a points deduction after going into administration in May, while Macclesfield Town and Southend United have been charged for not paying their players this season.

The prospect of losing gate receipts for the remaining games this season might "tip others over the edge", according to Catlin.

David Bottomley, the chief executive of League One Rochdale, says playing behind closed doors would be a "huge issue from a financial perspective" and, with six home games remaining, could cost up to £200,000.

That would include home and away fans who pay for their tickets on the day, and takings from bars and hospitality services.

Catlin, whose Portsmouth team has 14,500 season ticket holders, estimates that losses would amount to £100,000 a game. In addition, if games are played without crowds, the club faces the potential of compensating or crediting its season ticket holders.

One Championship chief executive told BBC Sport the uncertainty might also have an impact on season ticket sales next year.

Palios says matchday losses at Tranmere could be "between £250,000 and £300,000" for the remainder of the season.

He added: "You are probably looking at a total loss of £400,000 to £500,000, which would be unbudgeted and unwelcome."

What impact could that have?

Catlin, who will lead his team to the EFL Trophy final next month against Salford, says playing behind closed doors games would not be "life-threatening" for Pompey.

But he adds: "There's five or six clubs that I know over [League One and Two] who are in trouble already. It could be the difference in tipping them over the edge.

"There are clubs struggling and reliant on matchday income to pay wages at the end of the month."

Former Football Association chief executive Palios says Tranmere have enough money in the bank to save them from going under but adds: "A lot of clubs operate hand to mouth, and it may be that owners have to inject funds into the clubs."

He also hopes there is support from the wider football community. While the EFL expressed financial fears at Monday's government meeting, the Premier League is more concerned about completing its season in order to preserve the integrity of the competition.

"I'm not a great fan of handouts because you have to stand on your own two feet," Palios says. "Having said that, these are exceptional circumstances so if you are looking at real solidarity in the football world, help from the EFL, the FA and the Premier League is one of the avenues that needs to be explored.

"Equally, government is looking to support economy and business, and football clubs are part of that. There are variety of ways they could all help in that regard."

 

Is stopping football the right option?

England's deputy chief medical officer Dr Jenny Harries said on Tuesday that cancelling big outdoor events such as football matches would not necessarily be a decision supported by science.

"The virus will not survive very long outside," she said. "Many outdoor events, particularly, are relatively safe."

Accrington chairman Holt believes the season should be paused until the UK "gets a grip on coronavirus".

That might be concerning for fans whose teams are set to be promoted. It might also be of benefit to those clubs in the relegation zone.

But Holt maintains safety should come first. He says: "I am walking round our club at the weekend and there are 3,000 fans there and I am worried that inviting them altogether at our place is actually putting them in danger. Why would I do that?

"I have a lot of friends in Italy and they are telling me that the Italian government hasn't done enough."

Palios, whose team are in the League One relegation zone, says a wider perspective is needed.

"You are always cognisant of where you fit in the scheme of things and what you have to do is comply with best advice. If the government decide, in their wisdom, that means the cancellation of the season then so be it."

Catlin does not see that happening because of the knock-on effect it would have on the summer and the start of next season. In that sense, he regards games behind closed doors as "the lesser of two evils".

As to whether clubs would challenge the cancellation of the season in court, Palios adds: "I don't think clubs will do that. If they do, they have to mount a legal challenge against the government. I don't think any sensible person will look at that."

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/51804544

 

I'm a bit more worried now! 

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Would be good to see the clubs taking some initiative in the summer - a couple rounds of friendlies with a big promotion to get fans in and recoup the loss maybe? Pair off all the league sides for a few games perhaps. 

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The magnitude of this for our club can’t be ignored. 
 

Do we not only have 2 or 3 contracted first teamers after May? On one hand that’s good because we aren’t paying unecessary wages, but if this is for the longer term then the club can’t sell season tickets, sponsorship etc to generate the usual summer funds. In turn we can’t afford to sign players, offer signing on fees and are left with no team. Any time it’s decided to start back we will need Lee Clark back to sign 14 nobodies on the same day to make a team.

Realistically, this is our moment to save our club, get contributing to Trust in Killie to make sure we have a club/team at the end of this.

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I thought players contracts were worded so that they expired 'on May 31st or the completion of the season whichever is later' so that any extension was accounted for.

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By longer term I’m meaning I personally don’t think this season is getting extended, talks are going on behind the scenes on how best to void it if necessary.

If these emergency measures also go on longer term like beyond the summer and they bring back closed door games, we still aren’t generating any money. 

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8 minutes ago, Mclean07 said:

We will save on costs, which will offset some of the losses.

Not much - footballing wages are by far the biggest cost and are fixed, bonuses aside. 

Then there are Rates. 

I know you’re trying to support the Trust and TiK elsewhere and I don't think this is sending out the right message. 

 

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One positive we have is we don’t have bank debt which will be a chain around some clubs necks unless the banks are willing to let payments slide for a while which is unlikely. If we owe anything it’s likely to be to Billy and Phyllis I wouldn’t imagine they would suddenly call things in.

We will be paying the players a basic wage which we won’t get out of. We will save on matchday costs for the moment but it depends how much stuff we already had in place. We might have taken a hit over this weekend for programmes, food, policing/stewarding, staff given it was a late cancellation 

At some point I think governing bodies will have to step in in one way or another. The SFA are skint so they can’t help every club out. UEFA and FIFA have pots of gold but would it stretch to every club in the world. Governments can’t exactly get involved as they will have plenty more responsibilities to the wider population. 

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The SFA/SPFL have cost every club due to play at home at the weekend a lot of money, simply by delaying a decision until the English FA had made a decision. Had they cancelled everything on Thursday night instead of Friday afternoon the losses for all teams would have been minimal in terms of outlay. Sadly these are the same idiots who are deciding what to do next.

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2 hours ago, ParkHotel said:

The SFA/SPFL have cost every club due to play at home at the weekend a lot of money, simply by delaying a decision until the English FA had made a decision. Had they cancelled everything on Thursday night instead of Friday afternoon the losses for all teams would have been minimal in terms of outlay. Sadly these are the same idiots who are deciding what to do next.

While I thought it madness that we looked set to have 50,000+ supporters travelling across the British Isles on Sunday, I think that players and managers contracting the virus expedited matters. 

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4 hours ago, skygod said:

Not much - footballing wages are by far the biggest cost and are fixed, bonuses aside. 

Then there are Rates. 

I know you’re trying to support the Trust and TiK elsewhere and I don't think this is sending out the right message. 

 

Just trying to be balanced. We must have budgeted for four home games (not counted on five). I suspect the walk ups would be fairly minimal, given the nature of the games and how many people are season ticket holders or have free tickets. An exception would be if we were in the top six, which would have generated substantial walk up income. The only big income in the bottom six might have been a decisive game against Hearts. The other income amounts to profit from hospitality, programmes, raffle tickets, shop, pies. I doubt that is massive and we will save on staffing, stewards, turnstyles, power costs, police etc etc. We will also save onaway travel costs. 
 

I am fully aware we will need to cover losses, but no point in exaggerating. I would also suggest they issue season tickets asap, and offer the early bird discount, but offer people the chance to volunteer to pay the full amount. I would if required. 

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I would buy my season now, and put in what extra I could, anything to keep our club though this

Edited by theauldyin

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It won't just be this season that is affected, but next season as well. Add in the fact that supporters will have significantly less disposable income and the club (and every club) will be facing a massive financial hit. 

Killie should hopefully be OK as we only have a handful of players under contract and we should be able to sell Brophy and Findlay at knock down prices in a worst case scenario. 

I don't know whether administration is an option in order to sack backroom staff. 

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Whenever anyone uses the phrase "herd immunity" be mindful that this is just government spin and designed to give the impression that there's some sort of plan to completely losing control of the COVID-19 pandemic. 

I hope the Cheltenham Gold Cup was worth it. 

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3 hours ago, Mclean07 said:

Just trying to be balanced. We must have budgeted for four home games (not counted on five). I suspect the walk ups would be fairly minimal, given the nature of the games and how many people are season ticket holders or have free tickets. An exception would be if we were in the top six, which would have generated substantial walk up income. The only big income in the bottom six might have been a decisive game against Hearts. The other income amounts to profit from hospitality, programmes, raffle tickets, shop, pies. I doubt that is massive and we will save on staffing, stewards, turnstyles, power costs, police etc etc. We will also save onaway travel costs. 
 

I am fully aware we will need to cover losses, but no point in exaggerating. I would also suggest they issue season tickets asap, and offer the early bird discount, but offer people the chance to volunteer to pay the full amount. I would if required. 

St Mirren would have brought 1000+. 

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1 hour ago, fraz65 said:

Whenever anyone uses the phrase "herd immunity" be mindful that this is just government spin and designed to give the impression that there's some sort of plan to completely losing control of the COVID-19 pandemic. 

I hope the Cheltenham Gold Cup was worth it. 

The fact it’s a pandemic means it’s already out of control.

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5 minutes ago, Kanyon said:

The fact it’s a pandemic means it’s already out of control.

Not necessarily, as China and South Korea have shown. 

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6 minutes ago, Squirrelhumper said:

You'd need to be extremely gullible to believe the Chinese figures. 

How's your wager going that no games would be called off?

They're closing the additional hospitals and isolation facilities and allowing people to return to work. 

Edited by fraz65

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10 hours ago, KenVaagen1984 said:

Neil Doncaster’s wages should be shared among the non OF clubs. That would tide the diddy 40 over for a few weeks

Will be interesting to see if he continues to draw his full salary when the game is in crisis

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4 minutes ago, Pompey Exile said:

Will be interesting to see if he continues to draw his full salary when the game is in crisis

Let's be honest its times like these when wanks like Doncaster should and will absolutely need to earn their dough. 

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